4 reflections portfolio

What is the purpose of reflection? Where do you put the reflections in your portfolio? What makes a good artifact?

4 reflections portfolio

Unit 4 Reflection Unit 4 Reflection In this unit we looked a lot at the cell cycle, genetics, and the molecular basis inheritance. Chapter 12 encompassed the cell cycle, Chapter 13 talked about meiosis and sexual life cycles, Chapter 14 discussed Mendel and the gene idea, Chapter 15 elaborated on the chromosomal basis of inheritance, and Chapter 16 touched on the molecular basis of inheritance.

In Chapter 12 we looked at the cell cycles and cell division. The cell cycle extends from the creation of a new cell from the division of its parent cell to its own division into two genetically identical daughter cells.

Cell division functions in reproduction, growth, and repair. Cell division distributes identical sets of chromosomes to daughter cells.

Each eukaryotic species has a characteristic number of chromosomes in each somatic cell; reproductive cells, or gametes egg and sperm have half that number of chromosomes. Each chromosome is a very long DNA molecules with associated proteins that help it structure the chromosome and control the activity of the genes, forming chromatin.

Replicated chromosomes consist of two identical sister chromatids joined together at a specialized region called a centromere. The two sister chromatids separate during mitosis the division of the nucleusand hen the cytoplasm divides during cytokinesis.

The mitotic phase alternates with interphase in the cell cycle. The cell cycle consists of the mitotic M phase, which includes mitosis and cytokinesis, and interphase, during which the cell grows and replicates its chromosomes.

Mitosis is described in 5 phases: The mitotic spindle distributes chromosomes to daughter cells. The mitotic spindle begins to form in the cytoplasm during prophase. While the mitotic spindle assembles, part of the microtubules disassembles. The assembly of the spindle begins in the centrosomes.

Radial arrays of microtubules, called asters, extend from the centrosomes in animal cells. Non kintetochore microtubules extend out from each centrosome and overlap at the midline. Alternate tugging on the chromosome by opposite kinetochore microtubules moves the chromosomes to the midline of the cell.

The centromeres of each chromosome separate in anaphase, and the sister chromatids now considered chromosomes move toward the poles. During telophase, equivalent sets of chromosomes gather at the two poles of the cell. Nuclear envelopes form, nucleoli reappear, and cytokinesis begins.

Cleavage is the process that separates the two daughter cells in animals. A cleavage furrow on the cell surface forms, as a ring of actin microfilaments, interacting with myosin proteins, begins to contract on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane.

In plant cells, a cell plate forms from the fusion of membrane vesicles derived from the Golgi apparatus. Mitosis in eukaryotes may have evolved from binary fission. Prokaryotes reproduce by a process known as binary fission.

The single circular DNA molecule attached to the plasma membrane replicates, growth of the membrane separates the duplicate chromosomes, the membrane pinches in between the chromosomes, and a cell wall develops — creating two new identical daughter cells.

Possible intermediate stages in the evolution of mitosis from the binary fission of bacteria are seen in some groups of unicellular algae in which chromosomal division takes place within an intact nuclear envelope.

4 reflections portfolio

A molecular control system drives the cell cycle. Cytoplasmic chemical signals drive the cell cycle. A cell-cycle control system, consisting of a cyclically appearing set of molecules, coordinates the events of the cell cycle.

The cell cycle has checkpoints; important internal and external signals are monitored to determine whether the cell cycle will proceed past the 3 main check-points in the G1, G2, and M phases. The cell cycle has a sort of clock made up of cyclines and cyclin-dependent kinases.ePortfolios and Self-Reflection: Powerful Pedagogical Tools for Learning.

Student Learning, Technology for Teaching. ePortfolios and Self-Reflection: Powerful Pedagogical Tools for Learning. Megan O'Connor. . Unit 4 Reflection In this unit we looked a lot at the cell cycle, genetics, and the molecular basis inheritance.

Chapter 12 encompassed the cell cycle, Chapter 13 talked about meiosis and sexual life cycles, Chapter 14 discussed Mendel and the gene idea, Chapter 15 elaborated on the chromosomal basis of inheritance, and Chapter 16 touched on .

(POGIL) Record your teams results for each run in a neatly organized table. That is, if you did 20 runs of coin flips each, your table should have 20 rows of results, with percentages for each row and totals at the bottom.

Reflection: The step that makes a portfolio more than just a collection of work. As you move through your education, experiences will begin to present themselves that cause you to reconsider your perspective, change your mind, or deepen your understanding.

Reflection: The step that makes a portfolio more than just a collection of work. As you move through your education, experiences will begin to present themselves that cause you to reconsider your perspective, change your mind, or deepen your understanding.

Week 14 The reflection portfolio and its purpose are introduced; you start your note taking Weeks 15–22 Your note taking continues.

You are provided with detailed instructions for the reflection portfolio. May 29 Peer review June 4 Deadline for submitting your reflection portfolio.

You upload the.

Week 4 Reflection | DIGITAL PORTFOLIO